Anger

Billy’s Bloggerel – Where do ideas come from? (part 6 – Anger)

Created by Brothers McLeod with 0 Comments

Welcome to Billy’s Bloggerel, a web-log of doggerel… Where do Ideas come from? Part Six: Anger Francis: Was that Edward de Vere, Earl of Oxford? He seemed most vexed, leaving at a gallop. He almost bowled me about our wooden Globe And skittled me into the King’s players. Billy: Aye! It was that same accursed noble Who nobbles the very word noble, Making noble a curse, noble a fool. He would ask history to usurp me And replace my lowly Arden smiles With his over-born, glass-gazing visage. Like a leech, he came to draw out my soul To bite at secrets of inspiration. Francis: Tell. How did you answer his entreaties? Billy: At first I said naught, spilled over with spite. Then I collected my cruellest curses And gave him this gift… You ask how ideas begin, you cur! Demand to know? You cullion! You fop! Hoping to bankrupt my hours of study With your snake’s show of shallow flattery. Prepare. For I direct you to a source; My well of anger, disgust, fierce loathing, In whose vinegary pail you will discern Your own thin-tongued, vulture’s face reflected. You sly sweeper-up of stray threads and hairs. You bloodless scrounger of bold men’s banquets. I will tell, but also command your ears To wither under my full, righteous scorn, And your tongue to gall from opprobrium. True, some of my most prized rhymes and rhythms Are sown from soft days beside the Avon, Admiring soughing willows, dozing dogs, Watching waterfowl dip for weed and wheat, But not today, when anger is like the plough That churns a golden field to blood-brown knots. Aye, these ideas are as bone-strong knives, Already sharp as flint and fit to plunge Into an enemy’s fat, fetid heart. Anger breeds anger until it fills out The soul like foul cancer and must be felt. When first we met, you saw air where I stood, You had no talent for seeing talent, Only for grubbing silver from fat purses. But now that I am noted by noblemen, You at last observe me as a thing opaque. But even as you hoped to charm this wright, In your haste, you shoved at the awkward maid That stood ‘twixt your appetite and your meal. Her body, which to you is a mere door, Is to me the bearer of life and love. Here you volunteer as my evergreen, Renewing history in your favour, You false, finical, coxcomb. You cuckoo! You crave to ken what kindles me to scrawl? Have this as satisfaction. It is you! When I carve a criminal, a vile duke, A putrid whoreson, empty but for low ambition; when I smith a king of bawds Then will I think on you and rage and write. Your mark will be made, but as the fell fools, The base, penny-proud, belchers and pukers. I was a quill, a sail of smooth feather, But here you have made a sword of my pen. Francis: You said all this? His haste was warranted. Your anger is a font of profane words That I admire greatly. We must harness This wellspring of righteous woe and sorrow. Billy: ‘Tis already begun. Only when I have writ full this new play, Will my ire be done. Billy words and pictures by The Brothers McLeod [1] Billy animations on YouTube Billy badges at the RSC Shop [2] [1] http://www.brothersmcleod.co.uk/billysbloggerel.shtml [2] http://www.rsc.org.uk/shop/item/55231/

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Shakespeare’s Sonnets by Hallam London

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One day Hallam London stumbled upon a book of Shakespeare’s sonnets. When he decided to turn some of them into songs, he could build upon many different experiences—as a singer, guitarist and writer. He had studied Jazz Voice at the Dresden University of Music, had written songs for theatre plays, and had played the guitar in a pop band and in rock musicals and experimented with free improvisation as well as in a bizarre vocal duo. And last but not least he had founded the cosmofonics who toured all of Germany playing Hallam’s original songs. Having found Shakespeare’s sonnets only accidentally, his fascination for them grew quickly. This fascination—paired with the wealth of his experiences—lets Hallam write stunning pop songs: unconventional, artful and yet gripping and catchy. ‘Just as an arresting song or an astounding theatre play, a beautiful phraseology causes sudden feelings of happiness in me. When reading Shakespeare this happens quite often. Besides, I’m fascinated by the incredible variety of images in his language. He seemed to never run out of them, and they always cut right to the point. 'Furthermore, song lyrics often bore me—in fact, only a few don’t. The lyrics I wrote myself also didn’t meet my own standards, so something else had to be found. The internet is abundant with song lyrics free to be used, but almost all of them were put together from hackneyed phrases—leaving me with an uneasy feeling of familiarity. And, lacking even tender traces of imagery, there was no magic in them at all. In Shakespeare’s sonnets I find this magic—the magic that is essential to let me grow musical ideas.’ Hallam is currently working on a longplay album and a live show. As a teaser, he released the 5-track-album ‘The Winter EP – Shakespeare’s Sonnets’ in August 2012. You can find it on many download portals and on hallamlondon.bandcamp.com [1] The Winter E.P. – Shakespeare’s Sonnets by Hallam London [2] [1] http://hallamlondon.bandcamp.com/ [2] http://hallamlondon.bandcamp.com/album/the-winter-e-p-shakespeares-sonnets

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William Shakespeare – Experiential Language by Ellie Turner

Created by Ellie Turner with 0 Comments

Experiential language is an installation that enables the viewer to experience the use, rhythm and power of Shakespeare’s language through ‘listening’ and the use of visual narrative. Two experimental moving image pieces representing Romeo and Juliet. Set in contrasting daytime and nighttime environments to create specific tensions, they transport the viewer into both the character and extract’s psyche. The curtains are a symbolic representation of a window into a 21st century Shakespearian world. [1] [2] Romeo&Juliet ©ETurner 2012 [3] from Ellie Turner [4] on Vimeo [5].   [1] http://myshakespeare.rsc.org.uk/william-shakespeare-experiential-language/experiential-language/ [2] http://myshakespeare.rsc.org.uk/william-shakespeare-experiential-language/experiential-language-2/ [3] http://vimeo.com/49798791 [4] http://vimeo.com/user13606377 [5] http://vimeo.com

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Billy's Bloggerel - Love

Billy’s Bloggerel – Where do ideas come from? (part 5 – Love)

Created by Brothers McLeod with 0 Comments

Welcome to Billy’s Bloggerel, a web-log of doggerel… Where do Ideas come from? Part Five: Love Francis: O Billy? Billy? Wherefore are thou hidden? The Queen awaits your players and your play. This protesting protestant is our head And may remove ours if it pleases her. Billy: I am too busy for Queens of England, For I have met the Empress of my heart. Francis: If you deem that a metaphor of merit We are all doomed to smile on Royal spikes. Billy: But I am composing sonnets of sweet love For you see, my heart, it flies like a… Francis: Please do not say ‘dove’. I could not bear ‘dove’. Billy: For my heart flies like a… white pigeon? Francis: Enough! The Queen demands a play and a private Audience with her playwright and his pig. She would know from whence your ideas spring. Billy: From whence do ideas spring? O who cares! Francis: BUT- Billy: Nay! Hush awhile. And listen to my sonnet! From whence do ideas spring? Oh who cares When all needs are nudged out for sweet Anne. Wintry howls are our story-told affairs, When rivalled to true troth-plights piped by Pan. Why should I delve for tales like a mole that trawls, Clawing for seeds in filthy thick clay? Wherefore should I please strangers in stalls Whose love for me ends with th’end of my play? No. There’s no room in my inn for more guests. For love fills me like a loaf tin of baked bread, And o’erspills her like corseted breasts. No corner is empty in us newlywed. All else we are, love will ever outweigh. As true for this man, who hath Hathaway.   Francis: Tis a pretty sonnet. Worth a tear. Perhaps more if the Queen hears not some verse. Billy: I am distracted. And content to be. Francis: Or not to be if she is unfurnished With a tale that reddens her lead white face. All our necks are yours. All our fates are married. If you displease her she may make your Anne Shaxpere into Hamlet’s Ophelia. Billy: O! That quickens the heart as much as love! Come! From whence do ideas spring? O from whence? Now I see it! Ideas spring from love. Francis: Our friendship is like Falstaff’s waistband. Stretched. Billy: I will tell it in a sonnet. Francis: Must you? Billy: From whence do ideas spring? From our cares! We are like old ice crusting the cold peak Of a lonely hill. Till love like sun flares Thawing our burbling tongues, letting us speak. For whom would we write a single letter Or paint a single stroke, or sing an ode If not for those whose embrace unfetters And makes us their prince where once was a toad. When my love accepted a bent sixpence, When she took a pair of gloves and a ring, Then did her love let me trust my true sense, Then did the sun melt the source to the spring. When I am gone, and marked by a fell stone Remember all my verse was by love grown.   Francis: It is well said. Come, tell it to the Queen. If we tarry longer then I shall cut Both our heads off to save her the trouble. Billy words and pictures by The Brothers McLeod [1] Billy animations on YouTube Billy badges at the RSC Shop [2] [1] http://www.brothersmcleod.co.uk/billysbloggerel.shtml [2] http://www.rsc.org.uk/shop/item/55231/

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Kate Tempest 2

My Shakespeare by Kate Tempest

Created by Kate Tempest with 23 Comments

Watch Kate's performance of what Shakespeare means to her.

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First Light of the Morning by Chanon Treenet (Central Saint Martins)

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Inspired by William Shakespeare's Twelfth Night or What You Will, the film tells a story of the shadow which is being casted, parallel to what seems to be an everyday life routine.

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A Fool’s Face by Ana García Sebastiá (Central Saint Martins)

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Based on Shakespeare's Twelfth Night, it dwells on Feste's return to the house of his late master, whose son has also passed away. The sister, Olivia, mourns his brother's death, shutting down everything and everyone. It will become Feste's duty to make her see things on a different light.

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Devices and Disguises by Heather (Central Saint Martins)

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This micro film is based on The Twelfth Night. I choose two characters from it, Orsino and Viola, and focused on the emotion of Viola not being able to Orsino of her love. I use photoshop to draw all the pictures in my work includeing character design, background, and movement

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The Labyrinth by Joanna Adamska (Central Saint Martins)

Created by Joanna Adamska with 0 Comments

The Film present the character in a process of his/her revelation of self-identity and personal integrity through a spiritual journey from the external world reflected in the mirror to internal space represented by the labyrinth. This is a metaphor of the soul, where we communicate the conscious with the subconscious.

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China Magnolia By Amber (Zi-Qing Gao)

Created by Amber (Zi-Qing Gao) with 0 Comments

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